http://facecrooks.com Thu, 21 May 2015 14:10:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v= Facebook Real Name Policy Exposes Domestic Violence Survivors http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Facebook-Real-Name-Policy-Exposes-Domestic-Violence-Survivors.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Facebook-Real-Name-Policy-Exposes-Domestic-Violence-Survivors.html/#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 14:10:12 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9320 The post Facebook Real Name Policy Exposes Domestic Violence Survivors appeared first on .

Facebook has taken heat in recent months for its “real name” policy that requires users to register under an “authentic” alias found on official identification. The rule received bad press for punishing Native Americans and drag performers, but there’s another group that has unfortunately suffered: domestic violence victims. According to an article in The Daily…

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Facebook privacy issuesFacebook has taken heat in recent months for its “real name” policy that requires users to register under an “authentic” alias found on official identification. The rule received bad press for punishing Native Americans and drag performers, but there’s another group that has unfortunately suffered: domestic violence victims.

According to an article in The Daily Beast, many women use Facebook under a different name to escape from former abusive partners. These women still want to use Facebook to maintain their social lives, but when Facebook forces them to use their real names, it can potentially put them and their families in danger.

“It’s frustrating how you can be tagged and how your comments can be public if a friend has lesser privacy settings,” said one woman who quit Facebook. “I had a friend tag me once where we ate—I was terrified.”

While Facebook has its policy in part to prevent anonymous harassment and abuse on the site, some also believe that there is a financial incentive for the site to register users with their real names.

“They have made claims about how the names policy prevents abuse, but have presented no actual evidence,” he said. “The only two actual plausible explanations I have found are 1) They have had the policy for years and don’t want to put the energy into revamping it, or 2) They want to be able to match names to other data sets so they can sell their data to brokers.”

Facebook has improved the overall experience of users trying to prove their identities on the site, but it still has a long way to go when it comes to working with users’ individual privacy needs.



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Facebook’s Internet.org Blasted Over Security, Privacy http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Facebook%e2%80%99s-Internet-org-Blasted-Over-Security-Privacy.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Facebook%e2%80%99s-Internet-org-Blasted-Over-Security-Privacy.html/#comments Wed, 20 May 2015 13:36:51 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9316 The post Facebook’s Internet.org Blasted Over Security, Privacy appeared first on .

Facebook’s Internet.org initiative is dedicated to bringing the web to the two-thirds of the world not yet connected to it. However, many parts of the world may not want it at all. A coalition of community groups wrote an open letter to the site this week criticizing Internet.org for many issues, including potential censorship, privacy…

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Internet security comcept. Earth and lock.Facebook’s Internet.org initiative is dedicated to bringing the web to the two-thirds of the world not yet connected to it. However, many parts of the world may not want it at all.

A coalition of community groups wrote an open letter to the site this week criticizing Internet.org for many issues, including potential censorship, privacy and security issues.

First among their critiques: the name of the service itself. It isn’t exactly the Internet that Facebook is delivering, but the site and it’s partner’s version of the Internet. That means people in developing countries may only see what Facebook wants them to see, effectively putting tons of censorship power in the site’s hands. It also doesn’t use secure encryption, which would make it easier for hackers to spy on users or hack the site. The letter also attacked Internet.org’s data and privacy policies for possibly taking advantage of new Internet users who might not know how to navigate their settings.

“Facebook’s privacy policy does not provide adequate protections for new Internet users, some of whom may not understand how their data will be used, or may not be able to properly give consent for certain practices,” they wrote. “Given the lack of statements to the contrary, it is likely Internet.org collects user data via apps and services.”

Facebook may have good intentions for Internet.org, but in the wake of so many privacy-related scandals, it’s clear that nothing they promote will get taken at face value anymore — especially by the public abroad.



Recommended Resources

Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

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Belgian Privacy Watchdog Slams Facebook, Promotes Privacy Measures http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Belgian-Privacy-Watchdog-Slams-Facebook-Promotes-Privacy-Measures.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Belgian-Privacy-Watchdog-Slams-Facebook-Promotes-Privacy-Measures.html/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 13:55:13 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9314 The post Belgian Privacy Watchdog Slams Facebook, Promotes Privacy Measures appeared first on .

The Belgian Privacy Commission, a watchdog group that has long clashed with Facebook over the site’s data collection policies in Europe, released a scathing critique of the site last week that it accused it of mistreating its users. The Belgian organization said that Facebook “refuses to comply” with Belgian privacy laws and the laws of…

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facebook-privacyThe Belgian Privacy Commission, a watchdog group that has long clashed with Facebook over the site’s data collection policies in Europe, released a scathing critique of the site last week that it accused it of mistreating its users.

The Belgian organization said that Facebook “refuses to comply” with Belgian privacy laws and the laws of several other European countries, and instead only obeys Irish data privacy rules, the country where Facebook makes its European headquarters. The watchdog group also requested a study detailing how Facebook dealt with its users’ information, and they said that the resulting information was “disconcerting.” The group focused particularly hard on the social plug-in tool that allows Facebook to track users both on the site and across the web.

As a result of the study’s findings, the commission recommended that any webmaster who uses a Facebook social plug-in should also use a tool to obtain the consent of website visitors. They also recommended that individuals who don’t want to be tracked by Facebook should turn on the “Incognito” function in their browsers or use add-ons that block tracking.

While that doesn’t seem like a particularly strong measure to take, the commission’s rhetoric makes it clear that they’re willing to dig in and fight the social media giant.

“The way in which [Facebook] members’ and all Internet users’ privacy is denied calls for measures,” said Willem Debeuckelaere, the president of the Privacy Commission. “With this recommendation we have taken a first step towards Facebook and all Internet stakeholders who use Facebook, in order to ensure they start working in a privacy-friendly way. It’s bend or break.”



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Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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8 Steps to Protecting Your Child from Cyberbullying http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/8-Steps-Protecting-Your-Child-Cyberbullying.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/8-Steps-Protecting-Your-Child-Cyberbullying.html/#comments Mon, 18 May 2015 14:01:39 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9307 The post 8 Steps to Protecting Your Child from Cyberbullying appeared first on .

We’ve all heard of cyberbullying, but as a parent, do you know how to help your child protect him/herself from this?  With social media becoming fully ingrained in our teens’ lives, replacing other forms of communication, it’s inevitable that instances of cyberbullying will increase.  What makes this such a difficult issue to address is the…

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We’ve all heard of cyberbullying, but as a parent, do you know how to help your child protect him/herself from this?  With social media becoming fully ingrained in our teens’ lives, replacing other forms of communication, it’s inevitable that instances of cyberbullying will increase.  What makes this such a difficult issue to address is the underlying connotations.  When cyberbullying hits, often there is also shame – and that shame prevents children from speaking up and getting help.

A child who is unprepared for such behavior may feel blindsided by a bully’s capacity for malicious behavior when hidden by the anonymity of the Internet. Children may be ashamed to tell their parents or a friend, thinking it’s their fault or that there’s something wrong with them, or that they deserve to be harassed.  With so many pressures affecting them at once, they may simply not have the skills to handle situations adequately.  The good news is that there are clear, easy ways to combat it and with the proper safety measures, your child need not be dramatically affected.

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 Image Courtesy of Shutterstock

In this article, we’ll discuss eight strategies to consider when being affected by cyberbullying.  Some are for the kids, while others can be useful for parents.  Each strategy can be used based on the type of behavior your teen is experiencing:

Ignore It

Often the best response is to do nothing. Online bullies, or ‘trolls’, feed off of the engagement from their target. Sometimes they want nothing but to create conflict and inflict pain, regardless of how they feel about the responses. Shut down the conversation before it becomes interesting to the troll and he will get bored and move on.

Block Them

Depending on the bully’s persistence, your child may be receiving multiple unpleasant messages. A single, isolated message can simply be deleted and ignored, but a slew of distressing content cannot. Every cell phone and social media site has a block option. It takes only a few moments and cannot be bypassed.

Some bullies could have multiple accounts to get around this, but they can all be blocked faster than new ones can be created. Additionally, the bully will not receive any notifications that they have been blocked. It will simply appear as though taunts have gone unanswered or that your child’s account no longer exists.

Keep Records

As with any troubling incidents, what starts small could become worse over time. Keep records of all offending content in case more serious action is required at a later time. The ability to demonstrate persistent, malicious behavior will make it much easier to force a response from the authorities if needed.

Change Passwords

Some forms of cyberbullying involve stealing access into your child’s accounts and assuming their identity while posting embarrassing things in their name. This is easily resolved by changing the passwords of the vulnerable accounts, deleting the offending content, and posting a public explanation in the event that others were offended by the content.

It’s also worth noting that a bully may have altered specific contact info, including the email address where a new password will be sent. Be thorough in helping your child update their personal information to avoid repeated intrusions.

Inform the Websites

Sometimes, the password has already been changed by the bully, or a mock account has been created which you have no access to. In these instances, report the account directly to the website and they will disable the account or restore your child’s access. As stated above, it is good practice to block the offender if you know their identity.

Quietly Follow Them Online

As your child’s protector, it’s good for you to be as informed as possible without invading your child’s privacy. If you are ‘friends’ with their accounts, you can see what they are posting and what others post to them. For many parents, it is second nature to want to address the bully themselves; however, this can only make the situation worse for your child. Simply being able to see what is going on is just as helpful as saying something directly.

child_looking_notebook_2

 Image Courtesy of Shutterstock

Never Blame Them

It’s very important for your child to feel that you are a safe refuge from these attacks when they happen. Never blame your child for the behavior of others, no matter how the situation originated. Even if it was a mutual joke that went bad, it was still the other person who chose to escalate things to an inappropriate personal attack. Be absolutely clear that it has nothing to do with them and everything to do with the bully’s own issues. This way, if an attack can not be prevented, at least they will have in you a positive voice to counteract the damage.

Make it Easy to Talk About

Create a system, or structure, for how to handle an uncomfortable bullying situation. Some children prefer to fight their own battles, which is a necessary skill to learn, but make sure they know it’s not a weakness to ask for help. They will handle it well until they can’t, and they may not realize that things are beyond their ability to cope. Monitor them for increased anxiety or moping behavior, and offer to help them come up with a strategy. This lets you guide them toward a solution without fixing the problem for them.

With the ever-increasing use of the Internet, cyberbullying is becoming more common than ever. As a parent, it is important that you know the signs of cyberbullying, so you can be prepared to step in and protect your child, should the need ever arise.

Editor’s Note:

This is a guest post from Amy Williams - Amy is a journalist based in Southern California. As a mother of two, she hopes to use her experience as a parent to help other parents raise their children to be the best that they can be. @AmykWilliams1



Recommended Resources

Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

bitdefender trafficlightBitDefender Traffic Light is a free cross-browser add-on that intercepts, processes and filters all Web traffic, blocking any malicious content and taking browser security to new levels.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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Study: More Employers Are Looking At Your Social Media Than Ever Before http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Study-More-Employers-Are-Looking-At-Your-Social-Media-Than-Ever-Before.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Study-More-Employers-Are-Looking-At-Your-Social-Media-Than-Ever-Before.html/#comments Sat, 16 May 2015 15:46:39 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9302 The post Study: More Employers Are Looking At Your Social Media Than Ever Before appeared first on .

It’s no secret that potential employers snoop on the social media profiles of potential job candidates. And according to a recent study from CareerBuilder, more of them are doing it than ever before. The research found that 52 percent of companies now use social media sites to look at job applicants, up from 43 percent…

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Privacy symbol with digital globe, 3d renderIt’s no secret that potential employers snoop on the social media profiles of potential job candidates. And according to a recent study from CareerBuilder, more of them are doing it than ever before.

The research found that 52 percent of companies now use social media sites to look at job applicants, up from 43 percent in 2014 and 39 percent in 2013. However, they aren’t necessarily looking for incriminating evidence; 60 percent said they’re searching for evidence that actually supports an applicant’s qualifications for the job, while only 21 percent of companies said they’re looking for reasons not to hire someone. However, the study also found that 48 percent of hiring managers have found information that stopped them from hiring a candidate.

Here are the most common reasons why companies pass on a potential employee:

  • Inappropriate pictures (46 percent)
  • Drinking or drug use (40 percent)
  • Bad-mouthing previous employer or fellow employees (34 percent)
  • Bad communication skills (30 percent)
  • Derogatory comments (29 percent)

Another surprising statistic is that employers are 35% less likely to interview a candidate if they can’t find information about them online.

Thankfully, there can be a positive side to all that snooping. 32 percent of companies said they actually found information that caused them to hire a candidate. But this study only confirms what most savvy Facebook users already know: it’s always a good idea to represent yourself well on the site, but it’s downright essential if you’re hunting for your next job.



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Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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Woman Finds Her Selfies On Escort Site http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Woman-Finds-Her-Selfies-On-Escort-Site.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Woman-Finds-Her-Selfies-On-Escort-Site.html/#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 13:41:19 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9299 The post Woman Finds Her Selfies On Escort Site appeared first on .

Facebook photo privacy (or lack thereof) has been a hot topic in the news this week. The trend continues with the story of a 21-year-old woman Houston woman who found that her selfies were being used to market an escort service online. The woman, Adriana Henderson, discovered that her Facebook photos had been stolen when…

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Yellow Warning Sign - WTF - IsolatedFacebook photo privacy (or lack thereof) has been a hot topic in the news this week. The trend continues with the story of a 21-year-old woman Houston woman who found that her selfies were being used to market an escort service online.

The woman, Adriana Henderson, discovered that her Facebook photos had been stolen when she received random Facebook messages from strangers and when people in public mentioned it to her. She tried to contact the sites to get her pictures removed, but they have not complied. Local ABC news affiliate KTRK also called the number listed on one of the websites and no one answered. Later, the station received a text message saying that they “had the wrong number.”

Henderson is considering seeking legal help for the violation of her privacy.

“Somewhere it has to stop. I want my own identity. It’s embarrassing. It’s humiliating. I’m not that kind of person,” she said. “I just want to live my life.”

If you don’t want your Facebook photos stolen, you must take the simple step of limiting the potential audience for your profile. Whether you change it to Friends Only or Friends of Friends, simply switching it from Public view can make a major positive impact on your privacy.



Recommended Resources

Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

bitdefender trafficlightBitDefender Traffic Light is a free cross-browser add-on that intercepts, processes and filters all Web traffic, blocking any malicious content and taking browser security to new levels.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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How To Protect Your Facebook Profile Photo From Recent Privacy Change http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/How-To-Protect-Your-Facebook-Profile-Photo-From-Recent-Privacy-Change.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/How-To-Protect-Your-Facebook-Profile-Photo-From-Recent-Privacy-Change.html/#comments Thu, 14 May 2015 14:10:12 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9295 The post How To Protect Your Facebook Profile Photo From Recent Privacy Change appeared first on .

Facebook used to let users make their profile pictures unclickable. However, as pointed out by an article in CNET this week, that is no longer the case. That means that anyone, even Facebook users who are not your friends, can click on your profile photo and see a full-sized version. Unfortunately, truly securing your profile…

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who_viewed_your_profile_thumb1Facebook used to let users make their profile pictures unclickable. However, as pointed out by an article in CNET this week, that is no longer the case. That means that anyone, even Facebook users who are not your friends, can click on your profile photo and see a full-sized version.

Unfortunately, truly securing your profile photo isn’t as simple as it seems. Even when you change your privacy settings for the photo to “Only Me” (which is still recommended), that only prevents people from seeing likes, comments and other info associated with the pic. However, there’s still a way to add some protections.

First, check out your current profile photo. Facebook recently introduced a new cropping feature that crops both the thumbnail version of the image on your profile and the actual image itself. However, before the update, the site’s cropping tool only edited the thumbnail. That means that if your profile picture is old, people may be able to click on it and see the full-sized version. If that’s the case, you can take the photo down, re-upload it and crop it properly. You should also upload photos that are small and low resolution. That way, even if they are stolen, they won’t be much use to the person stealing it.

While these safety tips can’t prevent your photos being stolen, they can make it harder and less appealing for cybercriminals to grab.



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Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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Photographer: Facebook Rep Says Site Owns My Photos http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Photographer-Facebook-Rep-Says-Site-Owns-My-Photos.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Photographer-Facebook-Rep-Says-Site-Owns-My-Photos.html/#comments Wed, 13 May 2015 13:19:01 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9293 The post Photographer: Facebook Rep Says Site Owns My Photos appeared first on .

Photographer Corey Ann was outraged to find many of her photos circulating online, but with other people claiming credit. She wrote an angry blog post about it on her Photo Stealers website, and soon her Photo Stealers Facebook page—with 13,000 followers—was reported and blocked. However, that’s just the beginning of the story; when Ann reached…

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facebook iconPhotographer Corey Ann was outraged to find many of her photos circulating online, but with other people claiming credit. She wrote an angry blog post about it on her Photo Stealers website, and soon her Photo Stealers Facebook page—with 13,000 followers—was reported and blocked. However, that’s just the beginning of the story; when Ann reached out to Facebook about the issue, she received a response from an alleged Facebook sales representative that stunned her.

“Once something is posted or uploaded onto Facebook it becomes Facebook’s property,” the alleged rep wrote to her. “So if the original photographer uploaded the photo first onto Facebook and then others have taken it from there and uploaded it to their pages or profiles, this is legal and within policy, there’s nothing I can do about it unfortunately even if they are taking credit for the photos.”

Some skepticism has been raised about the truth of the rep’s comments; though it’s likely she does work for the social media giant, some of the points she made aren’t exactly true (Facebook licenses content on its site, but it does not “own” it).

Photography blog The Phoblographer pointed out several easy ways that this Facebook photo theft can be avoided altogether. Photographers should upload small images that are harder to use if taken. They should also watermark their imagery, or simply be more selective about what they upload.



Recommended Resources

Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

bitdefender trafficlightBitDefender Traffic Light is a free cross-browser add-on that intercepts, processes and filters all Web traffic, blocking any malicious content and taking browser security to new levels.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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Woman Mistakenly Facebook Shames Man For Being A Pedophile http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Woman-Mistakenly-Facebook-Shames-Man-For-Being-A-Pedophile.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/Woman-Mistakenly-Facebook-Shames-Man-For-Being-A-Pedophile.html/#comments Tue, 12 May 2015 00:05:09 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9291 The post Woman Mistakenly Facebook Shames Man For Being A Pedophile appeared first on .

An Australia woman posted a photo on Facebook of a man she believed was taking pictures of her children at a Target store. The post about this “creep” quickly went viral, being shared more than 20,000 times, and the man in the photo even received death threats. The only problem? He wasn’t taking pictures of…

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oopsAn Australia woman posted a photo on Facebook of a man she believed was taking pictures of her children at a Target store. The post about this “creep” quickly went viral, being shared more than 20,000 times, and the man in the photo even received death threats. The only problem? He wasn’t taking pictures of the woman’s children at all; instead, he was merely taking a selfie in front of a Darth Vader cardboard cutout to show his own three children.

The misunderstanding occurred when the man saw the woman’s children sitting unattended nearby. He told them he was going to quickly take a picture to send to his kids, though the story that the woman heard from her children was markedly different. According to her Facebook post, the man took a picture of her children and told them he was going to send it to a 16-year-old. When she heard this, the woman followed him, snapped his picture and reported him to police.

Though the man’s name has now been cleared, he can’t undo the damage done to his name and reputation. According to the woman responsible, she said she has learned a valuable lesson: be careful what you post on Facebook, because it could have unexpected power.

“One thousand times over I wish I could just take it back,” she said. “I think the biggest lesson out of it all is not to post anything that could hurt anybody on any media.”



Recommended Resources

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Blur is the first all-in-one solution that protects your passwords, payments, and privacy. It gives power back to people making it simple to choose what amount of their personal information they are OK providing to any website: no matter a) what they are doing- surfing, creating a new account, or shopping, or b) what device they are using – mobile phone, browser or tablet.

System Mechanic 14 – Make your computer run like new. Winner of 200+ Editor’s Choice awards!

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U.K. Woman Has Facebook Photos Stolen, Used On Tinder Profile http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/U-K-Woman-Has-Facebook-Photos-Stolen-Used-On-Tinder-Profile.html/ http://facecrooks.com/Internet-Safety-Privacy/U-K-Woman-Has-Facebook-Photos-Stolen-Used-On-Tinder-Profile.html/#comments Thu, 07 May 2015 23:35:25 +0000 http://facecrooks.com/?p=9289 The post U.K. Woman Has Facebook Photos Stolen, Used On Tinder Profile appeared first on .

A 27-year-old U.K. woman learned the hard way to protect her Facebook photos when she found a hoax Tinder profile using her pics. The woman, who found out about the imposter after receiving a screenshot from a friend, was understandably horrified. “This is a situation that many women can relate to and it is sadly…

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The post U.K. Woman Has Facebook Photos Stolen, Used On Tinder Profile appeared first on .

Eye Looking Through A KeyholeA 27-year-old U.K. woman learned the hard way to protect her Facebook photos when she found a hoax Tinder profile using her pics. The woman, who found out about the imposter after receiving a screenshot from a friend, was understandably horrified.

“This is a situation that many women can relate to and it is sadly more common than people may think,” Dr. Laura Toogood, managing director at Digitalis, told The Telegraph. “It is a frightening reality that you can have your private photos, and other information, used and distributed without your knowledge or permission. The security issues surrounding this type of identity theft can be wide ranging.”

The woman’s Facebook profile was linked to a business she owned, so she was reluctant to shut down her account completely. She contacted both Tinder and Facebook to notify them of the fraud, though she said both platforms told her she needed to provide all the account information for the fake profile. A Tinder spokesperson also told The Telegraph that anyone who finds a fake Tinder profile of themselves should contact Facebook; since the app takes all of its information from Facebook, that means the victim is also being impersonated on the site.

All told, the best way to avoid this kind of scary scam is to completely lock down the privacy settings on your Facebook photos, and diligently watch for any stray pictures of yourself to pop up in your Newsfeed. Of course, that’s small consolation for the victim in this case.

“I am powerless to stop it. But what feels even worse is that these technology companies that could help me, won’t do it,” she said. “The whole thing is horrifying.”

Always remember that your profile picture and cover photo are public and this can’t be changed. Also, be sure to use the audience selector tool for all of your photos and posts.



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